"BONDS After Hours" Teaches Parents And Kids Safety Tips

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By Catalina Trivino

We're taking action against crime tonight -- agencies from across Montgomery teamed up for an event tonight in hope of teaching kids and their parents safety tips. It was put on by the BONDS program, which stands for "Building Our Neighborhoods for Development and Success."

This parking lot was filled with kids earlier at the Department of Public Safety's South Central Office who came out to "Bonds After Hours," an event public safety officials held to teach kids what to do and what not to do when they're caught in a moment when their safety is at risk.

Dozens of people came out to "Bonds After Hours" in Montgomery, where law enforcement agencies and crime fighting groups taught parents and kids the latest information in safety tips. The Montgomery Fire Department demonstrated what to do in a fire inside its "safety house."

"It's kind of educating how you go through it and it's kind of like a real fire. It teaches your a lot about safety, about fire safety and all that," Said 11-year-old Jacody Bearden.

Firefighters say immersing kids into what feels like the real deal is the best practice.
 

"And in just that training in an emergency situation... it's the same as what firefighters do. We have to do the same training and it just gets us ready for the real thing," Lt. Jonothan Phillips with the Montgomery Fire Department.
But "Bonds After Hours" wasn't just for the kids.
 
Parents were able to speak with several agencies and groups that had booths set up to educate them about crime-fighting resources the county provides. Some of those groups include the District Attorney's Office and Neighbors In Christ, a group that helps victims with home  repairs after a crime.

 

"Some things I didn't know that the community had. You know, I knew about crimestoppers, but sometimes it is hard to get in contact with certain things so I got information about that," Said parent of three children, Leanna Kincannon.
 
Information that could save a life.
 
"It's not neccessarily enoguth for the adults to know how to be prepared and keeping them safe.. it's important for kids to be safe, as well. So we found it would be a good opportunity to show children some safety tips and safety facts and do it in a fun way," Said BONDS Director and host of the event, Regina Meadows.
All the agencies we spoke with say it's important to start teaching safety tips while kids are young, not only so they can trust officers and firefighters, but so they'll know what to do incase something happens in real life.

BONDS hopes to make this event a tradition every year.