Ruling on Arizona's Immigration Law Likely to Impact Alabama's Law

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By Tamika Bickham

The Supreme Court's decision on the Arizona Immigration Law will set the stage for a ruling on Alabama's law. CBS 8 Legal Analyst James Anderson explains what we can expect to see here.

"If they block this law, I believe it's good news here for everybody in Alabama."

That's the way one Montgomery business manager feels. He did not want to be identified, but tells CBS8 he moved here from Mexico in 1985. He says he's been the victim of racial profiling since Alabama's immigration law was passed.

"I travel a lot and I've been pulled over a couple of times and I believe they did it because I'm hispanic," he said, "He asked me for my drivers license. He asked me for my insurance card and I showed him and he let me go."

Based on the U.S. Supreme Courts' ruling on Arizona's law, that's something CBS 8 Legal Analyst James Anderson says can only happen if an arrest is made or traffic citation is issued.

"If they pull someone over for speeding, they are to check that person out. Under the Arizona law they are supposed to check out everyone that they arrest," said Anderson.

The rest of Arizona's law was struck down, like authorizing police to arrest illegals without a warrant, requiring unauthorizied immigrants to carry their papers at all times, and forbidding illegal immigrants from looking for work.

"School teachers won't be responsible. Employers won't be responsible. We had a lot of churches that were concerned about taking in people and housing people. Those groups won't have to worry," said Anderson.

Including this man, who is a Mexican immigrant and local business manager.

"If we have an opening, they can apply for it. I don't have nothing against nobody," he said, "It's great and I'm glad for a lot of people."

The ruling on Alabama's law will come from the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta. Anderson says they will follow the guidlelines from the Supreme Court's ruling on Arizona's law.

Governor Robert Bentley says his office is analyzing the effect today's ruling will have on Alabama's law, but says the heart of Alabama's law does remain intact.

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Betty Ramos said on Tuesday, Jun 26 at 4:26 AM

WHO DO YOU THINK PUTS FOOD ON OUR TABLE? ALL WILL KNOW WHEN FOOD NO LONGER IN THE STORE. THAT THOSE IMMIGRANTS ARE GONE. STORES CLOSE YOU GROW YOUR OWN OR YOU DON`T EAT.

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Antoine said on Tuesday, Jun 26 at 3:17 AM

Anything wrong in enforcing and or obeying the law? After all, millions have violated it and the Fed aren't doing anything but looking the other way.

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